How You Can Treat Eczema On Melanin-Rich Skin

How You Can Treat Eczema On Melanin-Rich Skin

Eczema makes skin inflamed, leaving it dry and itchy. This common skin condition can appear anywhere on your child's body. The appearance of eczema changes depending on your skin type. While it appears red on lighter skin, eczema often looks gray or brown on melanin-rich skin. Children with darker skin tones are more likely to experience eczema than Caucasian and Hispanic children. About 20% of African American children are diagnosed with eczema.  If your child suffers from a condition like eczema, it’s important to know how to treat it on skin of color. Help manage your child’s condition with skincare for melanin-rich children. Eczema Symptoms Eczema includes common skin conditions like: Atopic dermatitis Contact dermatitis Stasis dermatitis Dyshidrotic eczema Nummular eczema All these conditions cause inflammation leading to dry, itchy skin. Your child may develop more than one form of eczema. The symptoms can come and go with periods of remission between eczema flare-ups. In people with brown skin, eczema appears as brown, gray, or purple patches on the skin that may feel swollen, warm, itchy, or dry and scaly. Black people with eczema are more likely to experience dark circles and dryness around the eyes. Eczema sufferers with dark skin are more likely to develop Papular Eczema on their arms, legs, and torso, which looks like small bumps on the skin. They’re also more likely to get eczema conditions around their hair follicles called follicular accentuation. Your child needs to receive proper skincare for melanin-rich skin to manage eczema and other skin conditions effectively.  Treatments for Eczema A qualified dermatologist can examine your child’s symptoms and offer a specific treatment plan or skincare products for melanin-rich skin. Topical Steroids When first diagnosed or treating flare-ups of the disease, your doctor may prescribe a topical steroid treatment. This is a short-term treatment meant to calm the inflammation and reduce the itchiness of your child’s skin. Topical steroids are available in ointments, creams, and sprays in different strengths, depending on your needs.  Your doctor will give instructions for how many times per day to apply the steroidal treatment and where it should be applied. You may need to apply it to the child’s affected areas after a bath or shower. Always wash your hands after applying this treatment.  Longer-term treatment with steroids increases your child’s risk of adverse side effects. Common side effects from steroid treatment include acne, thinning of the skin, and dermatitis around the mouth. Your doctor may try to limit your child’s dosage and length of time on steroidal treatment to reduce potential side effects. Once treatment concludes, any side effects will eventually clear up on their own. Non-Steroidal Topical Treatments There are also non-steroidal topical creams like Elidel and Protopic available. Unlike steroids, these treatments are safe to use long-term. They are a class of medications called Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors. TCIs work by preventing certain immune cells from activating, reducing inflammation and other eczema symptoms. These medications are FDA approved for use in children aged two and up. Eucrisa is another non-steroidal topical ointment for eczema your doctor can prescribe. This treatment is a Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor that works at an enzyme level to reduce the amount of eczema-related cytokines produced. Eucrisa is FDA approved to treat eczema in children aged three months and older. TCIs and PDE4s can be applied anywhere on the body, including more delicate areas like the face, eyelids, genitals, and other skin fold areas.  Additional treatment options include phototherapy, oral medications, and biological injections to help reduce inflammation and other symptoms. All of these therapies are safe to use with patients of all ethnicities.  Eczema and Hyperpigmentation Patients with black skin are more likely to experience post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation after an eczema flare is treated. These are dark spots that remain on the skin once eczema has cleared. You can treat this condition using a prescription retinol lotion which helps lighten the dark spots over time. Eczema Prevention There are daily actions you can take to reduce your child’s eczema symptoms and prevent future flare-ups.  Keep Skin Moisturized Moisturizers and thick hydration crèmes are great for treating eczema. They help rehydrate and seal your child’s dry skin while reducing itchiness. Lotions and gentle skincare products should be used daily to help prevent future eczema flares. Consider an all-natural product like Melabebe’s Protect for nurturing your child’s melanin-rich skin.  Don’t Use Hot Water Only use lukewarm water for your child’s baths and showers. Hot water dries their skin out more and leaves it prone to itchiness. Try to limit their time in the water, as prolonged exposure dries skin out more. Make sure you’re giving your child’s melanin-rich skin nourishment with lotion after every bath or shower. Always Use Fragrance-Free Products Use fragrance-free or natural skincare for children to manage your child’s eczema. Eczema sufferers tend to have sensitive skin, and added fragrances in products can irritate your child’s condition. When You Suspect Eczema Always seek medical advice if you suspect your child is suffering from a skin condition like eczema. They can prescribe treatments to help clear your child’s eczema. In addition to medications, you can help treat your child’s eczema with the proper moisturizer. Look through reviewsof our product to see whether it’s the right choice for your child’s skin.

Five Ways to Care for Newborns With Melanin-Rich Skin

Five Ways to Care for Newborns With Melanin-Rich Skin

While many products available for babies smell wonderful and have beautiful, colorful bottles, some companies include harsh ingredients that increase shelf-stability and reduce manufacturing costs. For parents concerned about natural skincare for children, companies often charge exorbitant prices for products containing natural ingredients.  Melabebe believes melanin-rich skin is beautiful, and the key to keeping it healthy is a focus on ingredients that are natural and gentle on your child’s skin. Skincare for melanin-rich skin is easy once you know how to care for it properly. Needs of Newborn Melanin-Rich Skin While every newborn has sensitive skin, melanin-rich kids often have different skincare issues than newborns without as much melanin. As a result, this beautiful skin requires slightly different melanin-rich skin nourishment. Dryness and Dark Spots Because melanin-rich skin is naturally more sensitive, it is prone to dark spots and dryness, especially around the elbows, knees, legs, feet, and back.  If you notice your newborn’s skin looks ashy, that’s an indicator that your baby has dry skin. To prevent ashy buildup, it’s important to moisturize your baby’s skin using natural care products like almond oil, calendula, and chamomile. Do not try to exfoliate your baby’s skin to remove the ashy layer; because a newborn’s skin is so sensitive, this will lead to irritation and sensitivity. Eczema Common in many newborns, eczema occurs more often in melanin-rich skin. It usually appears within the first six months on a baby’s cheeks, forehead, scalp, and back of the arms.  When a newborn has eczema, you’ll notice red and bumpy skin with a rough or flakey texture. In melanin-rich skin, eczema sometimes presents as small pinpoint bumps or light patches that appear scaly.  Eczema is itchy and can make your baby uncomfortable. To soothe your baby’s skin, bathe your baby frequently in slightly warm water using a mild, fragrance-free soap and apply a moisturizer immediately after you pat them dry with a soft towel to trap as much moisture as possible.  To prevent itching and scratching, keep your baby’s nails trimmed short and consider soft mittens for your baby’s hands, especially at night when they may scratch in their sleep. If the condition is severe, reach out to your pediatrician for hydrocortisone cream. Transient Neonatal Pustular Melanosis (TNPM) Present in 5% of newborns, transient neonatal pustular melanosis (TNPM) presents as small white bumps that will pop and leave tiny flat brown spots behind. Fortunately, TNPM is considered a temporary condition, meaning it disappears naturally within 2-3 months.  To avoid permanent dark spots, treat with moisturizer, but do not apply any dark spot correctors because they are too powerful for newborn skin and cause irritation. Dermal Melanocytosis (Mongolian Spot) These harmless birthmarks appear in 90% of Native American and Black babies, 80% of Asian babies, and 70% of Hispanic babies. The marks vary in size but are a dense collection of melanocytes, or skin cells containing melanin, which appear mostly on the buttocks, lower back, legs, back, and shoulders. They generally disappear by age 4. Often, these marks are very concerning to new parents as their colors often mirror that of a bruise. If the melanocytes are gathered near the skin’s surface, these marks appear brown, but if they are located in lower skin layers, they take on a blue or purple tint. 5 Ways to Care for Your Newborn’s Melanin-Rich Skin At birth, your baby’s melanin-rich skin may appear lighter, but over your baby’s first three weeks of life, it will darken to its natural color. To help keep it healthy, follow these tips. Bathe your newborn properly During the first few weeks, while the umbilical cord site heals, stick to sponge baths.  Once your baby’s umbilical cord site has healed, bathe your baby in a shallow tub or sink, but be careful not to leave your baby in sudsy water for too long. Melanin-rich skin dries out easily, and many baby washes, even those specially formulated for melanin-rich skin, can rob the baby’s skin of natural oils. It’s best to use the baby wash at the very end of the bath and avoid bubble baths. Moisturize immediately after bath For sensitive baby skin, you want to trap the natural moisture of the water as soon as possible, so apply a moisturizer immediately after the baby’s bath. Avoid alcohol and scented products. If your baby’s skin needs additional moisture, consider adding a naturally formulated baby oil to help lock in moisture, especially during the winter. In winter, thick emollients, like vitamin E and coconut butter, provide improved moisture care without parabens, making them more effective and less irritating to a baby’s delicate skin. Protect skin from the sun Many people are under the misconception that melanin protects you from all harmful sun rays, so they believe melanin-rich skin doesn’t need a sun protectant, but that is simply not true. Protect your melanin-rich baby’s skin from the sun at all times, limiting sun exposure and applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen free from nano-particles and high in natural ingredients like zinc oxide. Stick to natural ingredients, avoiding harsh chemicals, detergents, fragrances, and dyes Due to its sensitivity, melanin-rich skin should avoid harsh chemicals, detergents, fragrances, and dyes whenever possible. Ingredients like calendula, chamomile, and oatmeal are soothing and leave behind a clean, delicately scented skin while preserving the natural oils. Don’t forget the shampoo ingredients Both skin and hair routines are important, but we often forget to check that shampoos and conditioners also include naturally derived ingredients. Textured hair also requires a different formula for proper care to maintain its original structure. Melebebe Knows Melanin-Rich Skincare for Children New motherhood is stressful, but skincare for melanin-rich children shouldn’t be.  Melabebe’s All-in-One Deep Hydration Crème is made from ingredients unchanged from nature so that you can rest assured that the moisturizer you apply to your baby’s delicate skin, whether it’s dry or prone to eczema, is safe. The All-in-One Deep Hydration Crème is suitable for all skin types at all stages of life, not just infancy.

How to Find a Black Dermatologist

How to Find a Black Dermatologist

Your child’s skin is the biggest organ on their body, and it must be properly cared for and nourished to stay healthy. However, darker skin tones do require different care, like specialized melanin-rich skin nourishment creams or treatments. If your child starts experiencing skin issues, they may benefit from seeing a dermatologist. Unfortunately for patients of color, many dermatologists in the US lack the knowledge to properly treat black skin. Your dermatologist must know how conditions appear on melanated skin and how to best care for your child’s darker skin tone.  You may find the best quality of care from doctors who have melanin-rich skin themselves and understand your medical needs. A black dermatologist has first-hand experience in how conditions present and which are the most common.  What Does a Dermatologist Do? Board-certified dermatologists are doctors who care for your skin and treat conditions like acne and hyperpigmentation. A dermatologist also treats symptoms of hair loss and performs skin cancer screenings. Currently, only 3% of dermatologists in the US are black.  Why is this a problem? Just as in the beauty industry, the medical field lacks proper representation and services for patients with dark skin. Skin conditions can appear differently on melanin-rich skin than doctors are traditionally trained to identify.  47% of dermatologists believe their medical training to detect skin conditions in black people was inadequate. If doctors aren’t aware of what to look for, they could miss a diagnosis, and your child could suffer needlessly. You need the properskincare for melanin-rich children like yours. Common Conditions Dermatologists Treat Some skin conditions are more prevalent among people of color. Others are harder to detect because of the black hues in melanin-rich skin. These include conditions like: Acne Keloidalis Nuchae Acne Keloidalis Nuchae (AKN) is more common in darker skin types and those with tightly coiled hair. It is a type of scarring alopecia that appears as small bumps along the hairline and nape of the neck. Be diligent in applying your moisture and hydration créme around your hairline to avoid triggering AKN. Eczema This is a chronic skin condition that disproportionately affects African Americans. It appears as dark purple or brown patches on the skin and may feel scaly or dry. Treatment for your child’s eczema includes moisturizers and treatments with natural skincare for children. Skin Cancer People with darker skin tones are less likely to develop skin cancer than non-Hispanic white people. However, African Americans who develop skin cancer are more likely to get diagnosed at a later stage. Later-stage cancers are harder to treat and have fewer positive outcomes. It’s crucial to find a dermatologist with in-depth knowledge of the skin conditions and increased risks associated with your melanated skin. How to Find a Black Dermatologist Luckily there are many resources available to help you find a black dermatologist for your child.  Search Your Insurance Network First, look for a dermatologist through your child’s insurance network. Your insurance company’s online directory will list doctors near your location. You can search by specialty and find the dermatologists closest to you. All the doctors in your insurance company’s directory work with your health insurance. Ask for a Referral You can also ask your child’s primary care doctor for a recommendation. The pediatrician or primary care doctor may know black dermatologists in the area. Doctors network with each other and are happy to refer new patients to one another. Look Through Online Directories You can also find black dermatologists by searching directories online. The American Academy of Dermatology allows you to search for members by location or doctor’s name. It’s a good resource for researching any dermatologist your doctor recommends. The directory can help you search for specializations within dermatology like pigmentation or acne. Other websites like Skin of Color Society (SOCS) and HUED allow you to search for doctors by state, insurance provider, and specialty. You can find dermatologists that offer in-person and virtual appointments. Read Patient Reviews Make sure you look for reviews online for any dermatologist you find. See if other patients think the doctor understands the issues prevalent among darker skin tones and provides adequate skincare for melanin-rich skin. Ensure your health insurance covers the doctor you choose, and they offer any specialized treatment your child needs. When to See a Dermatologist If your child is experiencing problems with their skin, it’s essential to seek advice from a dermatologist as soon as possible. You need to find an expert in diagnosing and treating melanated skin to improve your child’s confidence and quality of life. Use online directories to find a black dermatologist near you or ask for a referral from your family doctor: research and read patient reviews to help you find the right dermatologist for your child.

How to Reduce Dark Spots from Forming on Black and Brown Skin Due to Acne or Bug Bites

How to Reduce Dark Spots from Forming on Black and Brown Skin Due to Acne or Bug Bites

Many parents are concerned about their children’s skin and hair health, especially those with melanin-rich skin types. Your child may spend a lot of time outdoors playing and engaging in physical activities that leave them vulnerable to insect bites, and hormonal changes during puberty can lead to acne breakouts.  Due to higher pigmentation content, melanin-rich skin can show dark spots and hyperpigmentation, particularly on areas with blemishes like acne or bug bites. Melanin-rich skin has unique needs that require regular attention to prevent dark marks or irritation due to dryness.  Protecting your child's skin is best achieved by diligently practicing skincare for melanin-rich children with the help of natural, child-safe products. Why Does Melanin Rich Skin Require Different Care? Melanin is a pigment found in skin cells known as melanocytes, which produce melanosomes and absorb Ultraviolet (UV) rays to protect you from UV damage. The pigment cells in melanin-rich skin are more active and reactive than those found on lighter-skinned people. When there is trauma, such as acne or bug bites, these activating pigments get triggered by inflammation, causing patches to form around the affected area, contributing to skin conditions such as: Post Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation (PIH) Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) is common after an inflammatory wound, such as a pimple. Dark spots left behind are one example of this condition and can be treated with proper skincare for melanin-rich skin. Approximately 65% of African Americans suffer from PIH. Melasma Melasma is a skin condition where there are dark brown or grayish-brown patches on the areas around the face, like the chin and the forehead. Melasma is often caused by exposure to sunlight which stimulates the melanocytes to produce excess melanin. Keloids Keloids are abnormal, raised scars that form after an injury like a bug bite has healed. Some symptoms include discomfort, redness, and pigmentation. About 10% of people develop keloid scars in the United States.  Dyschromia Dyschromia usually refers to changes in your skin color, such as an increase or a decrease in pigmentation. Dyschromia is a growing concern among many people, with over 24.7 million medical visits for dyschromia in the United States between 1993-2010. Melanin-rich skin cells also have a higher lipid content, making you more susceptible to acne. Your skincare products should work to regulate sebum production to not only improve your skin but also prevent breakouts. Prevent and Reduce the Appearance of Acne and Bug Bites on Your Child People with melanin-rich skin can suffer from uneven skin tone resulting from bug bites and acne. Taking the following preventative measures with your child can prevent dark spots and other skin conditions from appearing. Apply Sunscreen to Your Kids' Skin Everyday Melanin allows your skin to tan easily, but tanning is a sign of sun damage. Although natural melanin-rich skin provides better protection against sun exposure than other skin types, there is always a risk of developing severe problems such as skin cancer.  People with melanin-rich skin may be less inclined to apply sunscreen because they don’t burn as easily. However, one blistering sunburn as a child can double the risk of having melanoma later in life, which is why practicing diligent skincare as a child is critical to long-term health.  A mineral sunscreen containing zinc oxide or titanium dioxide helps protect sensitive skin from burning or becoming darker in areas exposed to the sun. The American Academy of Dermatologists recommends using sunscreen with an SPF of 30 and higher and reapply it every two hours while outdoors.  Don't Let Your Kids Scratch Bug Bites Sharp, small fingernails can irritate the skin around a bug bite, allowing bacteria to enter into the area and causing skin conditions such as dark spots to develop. You can teach your child that touching the area around their bug bites can make its appearance worse.  When a bug bite occurs on your child's skin, wash the area with mild soap and water and gently apply ice to reduce irritation. Treat the area as needed for pain relief using calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream.  You can also use natural skincare for children to help with the healing process and fade dark spots. If the area develops signs of infection such as swelling or pus, it is best to see your child’s pediatrician for medical treatment.  Choose Skincare Products With Gentle Ingredients Many people of color have sensitive skin, which means they can experience side effects such as migraines and irritation from the chemicals found in most skincare products, such as fragrances. These can irritate sensitive skin or make them break out in acne that could lead to dark spots. You must look for gentle ingredients in your skincare products, such as shea butter and jojoba oil, that can provide melanin-rich skin nourishment. Use Moisturizing Skin Care Products for All Your Skin’s Needs Adding moisturizing skincare products to your skin can not only reduce hyperpigmentation but also helps to maintain an even skin tone. They can also reduce the excess production of melanin. Choose skincare products that include: Kojic acid Azelaic acid Glycolic acid Vitamin C  Keeping the skin well-moisturized can help lessen oil production, reducing instances of acne. Your teens’ natural skincare products must have ingredients made for their acne-prone skin, like safflower oil that can hydrate their skin and shea butter, which is excellent at healing scars.  Use Chemical Peels on Acne Scars Having melanin-rich skin means your child’s skin produces more oil, leading to acne that may carry into adulthood if left untreated. To treat acne, use products containing ingredients like benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid. Salicylic acid is an ingredient that can help clear clogged pores and prevent new breakouts. Acne scars are a common issue for teens, but chemical peels can help them fade with time. Chemical peels are used to remove the outer layer of dead skin, allowing new cells to take their place and making your teenager's acne scars less visible. They help with acne scars and speed up the healing process from post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.  Care for Your Child's Melanin-Rich Skin Melanin-rich skin requires special care; your child needs to use the right skincare products to help control oil production and heal their skin if they are dealing with acne.  If your child is experiencing any severe skin conditions, you can refer to a dermatologist to answer your skin questions and provide the proper treatment for skin of color.  Your child can also practice skincare for melanin-rich skin with natural ingredients that meet all the unique needs of black or brown skin. Melabebe uses natural ingredients in our Protect product, so you know it’s safe for your child’s melanin-rich skin.  Kids can feel more confident about their appearance and complexion when using a product designed with black and brown skin types in mind.

What is Hyperpigmentation and How to Get Rid of it?

What is Hyperpigmentation and How to Get Rid of it?

Hyperpigmentation is when your skin develops spots of patches that are darker than your natural skin tone that is caused by an overproduction of melanin, the pigment that creates your skin color. Hyperpigmentation is particularly common among people of color, though it can affect anyone. Keep reading to discover more about the causes of this skin issue and how you can prevent hyperpigmentation and treat it. Common Causes of Hyperpigmentation There are many causes for hyperpigmentation for both people with melanin-rich skin or those with pale complexions. Skin Trauma Skin trauma covers a wide range of incidents, from the serious to the everyday, including acne, eczema, cuts, insect bites, scratching, or chafing. These kinds of traumas cause inflammation that encourages your melanin-producing cells to kick into overdrive. This localized increase in melanin production can leave behind dark spots in place of the injury once it has healed. This type of hyperpigmentation is most common in children. Melasma Melasma is characterized by brown freckle-like spots or large brown patches, particularly on the face (especially in the regions of the forehead, cheeks, bridge of the nose, and the chin) however also in other areas such as the neck and forearms. It is most commonly seen in women but can also occur in men and children. There are several triggers for melasma, including sun exposure and genetics, but it is particularly linked to hormonal shifts, specifically steep rises in estrogen and progesterone that stimulate melanin production. For this reason, it tends to occur while taking oral contraceptives, at the onset of puberty in children, or during pregnancy. Sun Exposure One of the benefits of melanin is that it can help defend your child’s skin from sun damage (however, it cannot protect them from dangerous skin conditions such as skin cancer, and their skin care for melanin-rich skin routine should always include daily sunscreen) as such, skin produces extra melanin when it is exposed to the sun. This is what causes a suntan. People who are frequently or excessively exposed to damaging UV rays can develop dark patches on their skin known as sunspots. Sunspots themselves are not cancerous; however, precancerous blemishes -which are common among people who have spent a lot of time in the sun- look very similar, so you should get yourself checked out regularly by a dermatologist. Children’s skin is extra sensitive to the sun, so keep your kids covered up as much as possible and use at least an SPF 30 broad-spectrum sunscreen. Medical Conditions Several medical conditions can cause instances of skin discoloration. One such condition is the adrenal gland disorder, Addison’s Disease, which can boost melanin production in the skin. Medications There are several drugs and medical treatments that have been linked to hyperpigmentation. These include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, certain antibiotics, and some chemotherapy medications. Preventing and Treating Hyperpigmentation Although hyperpigmentation is not dangerous, many people who have it do not like its appearance and want to get rid of it. Fortunately, there are several treatments, products, and behaviors you can adopt to prevent or reduce hyperpigmentation, from giving your melanin-rich skin nourishment and moisture to getting a professional chemical peel. Some of these methods are unsuitable for children, so always consult a dermatologist with experience treating children with dark skin before taking action to improve your child’s hyperpigmentation. Keep Skin Moist and Hydrated Keeping skin well hydrated is part of good skin care for melanin-rich children and adults, and there are several reasons why moisturized skin improves the appearance of hyperpigmentation. Hyperpigmentation is more obvious when your skin is ashy or dry, while the ingredients found in products like Melabebe’s moisture & hydration crème activate brighteners in the skin. These same ingredients also boost cell turnover and regeneration, helping dark spots to fade quicker. They can also restore the skin’s fat barrier, which helps protect skin from the sun. Discourage Your Child From Picking at Their Skin Blemishes like acne, bug bites, and scratches are extremely tempting to pick at, but doing so can increase your child’s chances of getting hyperpigmentation. Touching skin traumas increases inflammation, increasing the production of melanin leading to dark spots. Instead of picking at blemishes, keep them clean and hydrated. For itchy bug bites, use over-the-counter calming products to soothe the itching and relieve the temptation to scratch. If your child finds it hard not to touch their blemishes, invest in some natural skin care for children and show them how to look after the skin rather than damage it. Try Over-the-Counter Treatments Because hyperpigmentation is such a common issue, there are plenty of over-the-counter skin care products aimed at lightening dark spots. Effective hyperpigmentation products usually contain ingredients such as licorice root, vitamin C, kojic, vitamin E, niacinamide, arbutin, and soy. Many people have great success with these products, but it can often take weeks or months to notice any change. This can be frustrating but avoid the temptation to keep piling on new products before they have had a chance to work, as this can cause irritation. Do not try these methods on your kids without advice from your dermatologist; skin care products for melanated children should be focused on nourishment, like the natural, vegan, moisturizing cream by Melabebe. Get Treatment From Your Dermatologist While over-the-counter remedies can be effective, you are much more likely to have success with treatment prescribed by a professional dermatologist specializing in children’s skin issues. The most common product they prescribe is prescription-strength hydroquinone, which has a fantastic success rate of lightening hyperpigmentation. Your dermatologist must closely monitor this treatment because it can cause irritation and skin bleaching. It can also make your skin more sensitive to the sun’s harmful rays, so you must be extra vigilant with your sunscreen routine while using products that contain hydroquinone. More Aggressive Procedures Are Only for Adults In cases of stubborn hyperpigmentation, topical remedies are not always enough. However, dermatologists can recommend other procedures to improve dark spots, such as chemical peels, dermabrasion, microdermabrasion, or laser treatment. While these treatments are effective for adults, they are too aggressive for children. Get Rid of Hyperpigmentation for Good Hyperpigmentation is a common skin imperfection that disproportionately affects people of color. Fortunately, it is not dangerous, and there are many methods to improve its appearance or get rid of it entirely if your child feels self-conscious about it. However, if you are serious about reducing your child’s hyperpigmentation, you should try to reduce their chances of getting it by protecting them from the sun and using nutrient-rich moisturizing products.

What‌ ‌is‌ ‌Melanin‌ ‌and‌ ‌How‌ ‌Does‌ ‌it‌ ‌Affect‌ ‌My‌ ‌Skin?‌ ‌

What‌ ‌is‌ ‌Melanin‌ ‌and‌ ‌How‌ ‌Does‌ ‌it‌ ‌Affect‌ ‌My‌ ‌Skin?‌ ‌

Melanin is a naturally occurring pigment in human skin responsible for the variety of skin tones seen throughout the world. A darker skin tone indicates a higher concentration of melanin, while a lighter skin tone means the person has less melanin in their skin. If you are a parent to a child with melanin-rich skin, it is helpful to learn about melanin and how it affects your child’s skin. Discover the purpose of melanin in the skin, the benefits, and special skin care considerations for those who have a melanin-rich skin tone. What is Melanin? Melanin is a skin pigment that produces different skin tones. There are two types of melanin located in the human epidermis: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Pheomelanin produces yellow-reddish pigmentation, while eumelanin produces black-brown tones. Melanin production is carried out by large cells known as melanocytes. Melanocytes produce melanosomes, which synthesize for pheomelanin and eumelanin, which are then distributed to the skin cells throughout the body. The higher number of melanocytes your body contains, the darker your skin color. What is the Purpose of Melanin? Melanin is a genetic trait that evolved as a protection from harmful UV rays. It is believed that as early humans lost extra body hair that protected them from the sun, their bodies began to produce melanin to keep their skin protected from UV light. As populations migrated from Africa to Europe, melanin levels adjusted to the amount of UV radiation that reached their skin. This is why lighter-skinned populations typically appear in colder, less sunny climates, and melanin-rich, darker-skinned populations are seen in warmer climates. Benefits of Melanin-Rich Skin Melanin offers two main protective benefits to children with a rich concentration of melanin in their skin, including UV protection and antioxidant benefits. UV Protection Melanin offers your child a small amount of protection against all forms of UV light. Melanin protects the outer layer of skin by absorbing UV light. It does this before the UV rays damage cells on your child’s skin, which gives them slightly more protection than children with lower amounts of melanin in their bodies. Antioxidant Benefits Melanin is a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, which means that it scours the body for ROS caused by UV sun damage and interacts with them to neutralize oxidative damage to the cells. The extent and exact amount of melanin that promotes these benefits in your child’s body are unknown, so make sure to take care of their skin with melanin-rich skin nourishment and use sunscreen with a high SPF as part of their daily skin care routine, as prolonged sun exposure can cause skin cancer over time. Special Considerations When it comes to your child’s skin, there are a few special considerations to consider. The most important is that children with melanin-rich skin can be prone to eczema, a skin condition that creates dry patchy areas on the outer layer of skin. Eczema can cause itching and discoloration in darker skin tones. Another special consideration that children with melanin-rich skin face is scarring. In dark skin tones, scar tissue can appear much darker than the surrounding skin, causing discoloration. If you are concerned about these issues for your child, invest in quality skin care for melanin-rich skin. Skin care products for melanated children focus on natural ingredients that provide moisture and soothe itchy, dry skin. Where to Find Natural Skin Products for Melanin-Rich Skin When it comes to natural skin care for children, opt for a company with products that use natural ingredients like shea butter, jojoba oil, vitamin E. oil, and aloe. Melabebe features products that are specially formulated for your little one with melanated skin. Our moisture & hydration crème is made to hydrate your child’s melanin-rich skin and keep it smooth and soft. Melabebe’s skin care for melanin-rich children is the perfect combination of natural and effective when it comes to protecting your baby’s skin.

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